Rudy Panucci On Pop Culture

Marxism Takes Over The World

The PopCulteer
August 24, 2012

The Marx Toy Museum
Photo Essay Part Two

Part Two–Marxism In The Toy World

In this part of our photo essay, we will look at the historical high points from the story of The Marx Toy Company. We’ll begin with a look at some of the classic tin toys and early licensed items featuring Popeye, Mickey Mouse and others, and we’ll follow the trail of toys all the way to the huge riding toy successes of the 1970s.

We’re also going to explore the prototype room at The Marx Toy Museum, which is filled with one-of-a-kind sample figures, original hand-carved models, original art that was used on the packaging and unreleased playsets and toys.

This photo essay is broken into five parts, so that the graphics don’t overwhelm your browsers. Convenient links will be posted at the top and bottom of each essay, so that you can jump around at will.

 The Marx Toy Museum Photo Essay

Part One–Meet The Museum
Part Two–Marxism In The Toy World (You’re reading this one now)
Part Three–Playsets And Plastic People
Part Four–Girl’s Toys
Part Five–Johnny West And The Cowboys

In the 1930s, Popeye was one of the first major toy hits to be licensed from cartoons or comic strips. Marx released a ton of cool tin toys based on the Sailor Man

At his peak popularity, Popeye sold more toys than any other character, even Mickey Mouse

Popeye’s face could sell anything

Marx did let Mickey get inon the act, thoo

Smokey Stover was a hot commodity back in the 1940s

The 1950s and 1960s were pretty cool, too

More classics from the Depression era

As we move to later eras, you see plastic replacing metal on kid’s toys

I know, I’ve posted photos of The Great Garloo in this blog many times before…

…but have you ever seen THE BOX?

Likewise, every chance I get, I post a photo of Big Loo…

…but I never thought I’d see the box he came in. That thing is HUGE!

We can’t leave out one of Marx’s biggest successes, Rock ‘Em, Sock “Em Robots, designed by Marvin Glass Associates

Marx sold some pretty nifty vehicles, too

Y’know, not all toys are made for kids. The semi-nude “Bathing Beauties” were given out by Louis Marx to his buddies, not sold to the public

You will see more of the legendary Marx Playsets in part three

During WWII, the Marx factories shut down their toy production to make munitions, like this big honkin’ shell

Firemen hold a very special place in toyland

Marx also sold scientific and educational toys, like this  kit

Meanwhile on the licensing front, it’s Dick Tracy to the rescue

Dinosaurs and popguns…two great tastes that taste great together

Back in the Prototype Room, we find literally hundreds of hand-carved original figures

I’m not entirely sure what all this is, but it sure looks cool

Another shot of the science toys

Yeah, it’s Chief Cherokee, Thunderbolt, and Johnny West, but you still have to wait until part five to see more

One of the riding toys that carried Marx Toys through the 1970s

This was the one that really took off…The Big Wheel

This photo essay is broken into five parts, so that the graphics don’t overwhelm your browsers. Convenient links will be posted at the top and bottom of each essay, so that you can jump around at will.

The Marx Toy Museum Photo Essay

Part One–Meet The Museum
Part Two–Marxism In The Toy World (You just saw this one)
Part Three–Playsets And Plastic People
Part Four–Girl’s Toys
Part Five–Johnny West And The Cowboys

1 Comment

  1. Terry Fehr

    Still have that jeep in the box.

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